F4U1-C "C-Hog"

Discussion in 'Fighter Tactics' started by Waystin2, Dec 28, 2019.

  1. Waystin2

    Waystin2 Administrator
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    Overview

    While being a historically rare aircraft, the C-Hog is reasonably common in Aces High because it really is a special aircraft. Most Corsairs are solid aircraft in Aces High but the C-Hog is special because it has overwhelming firepower, possibly the most fearsome in a fighter in the game. To place some sort of control on it, the C-Hog is a perk aircraft in AH, although the perk value is set very low and creates a good balance between usefulness and risk. Easily affordable, the C-Hog is a great entry level perk aircraft that can be used to great effect in almost any role.



    [​IMG]
    F4U1-C
    Engine Performance

    Corsairs love speed but have some trouble building it themselves. The C-Hog is good once up to speed, 342mph at sea-level (356mph with WEP), but getting there is a bit of a struggle. Best cruise altitudes for the C-Hog are either quite low (350mph @ 2K) or mid-high (380mph @ 19K) and top speed is only 402mph with WEP at 20K. Acceleration at low altitudes is about middle of the pack and at high altitudes is more towards the bottom 3rd. Climb rate is about equally dissappointing, 3,000ft/min at low levels and holding pretty steady around 2,800ft/min up to mid-high altitudes. Most aircraft are going to both out-climb and out accelerate you. In a dive, the C-Hog can really excel though, it can use the massive engine power and weight to help it accelerate. Fuel duration is reasonable, 28 minutes on full internal fuel with the option to add up to two drop tanks that each add 18 minutes more, for a total of up to 65 minutes. Taking drop tanks is not unreasonable and there are options in the hangers that can add only 1 drop tank while still retaining some external ordinance capacity. Fuel weight is an important consideration in the C-Hog as full internal fuel weighs over 1,400lbs, a large penalty in maneuverability.

    Firepower

    This is what sets the C-Hog apart from the crowd, it packs four hispano 20mm cannons, two/wing, with a very generous 230 rounds/gun, typically double the average ammunition for cannons. The hispano cannons fire very quickly, have outstanding ballistic properties, and are the hardest hitting 20mm cannons in the game. While a generally recommended firing range for most aircraft is ~D350, the C-Hog can usually take shots much further out, sometimes as far as D600 and know they can make kills. There have been cases of even longer ranges shots in excess of D1.0 that aren't even considered rare. The large ammunition loading also allows you to fire a little more frequently on lower percentages shots without fear of running out of ammunition. Adding another dimension, each cannon is paired such that your primary and secondary triggers will only fire one set at a time. Only one pair of cannons is typically far in excess of what is required to maul a fighter sized contact, meaning you can use one set of guns, then the other, giving huge amounts of combat persistence while retaining a deadly sting. When needed, you can fire all four guns and simply demolish things, be it aircraft, vehicles, or structures on the ground. Adding to the guns, you also have the option for external ordinance, with two wing stations for bombs up to 1,000lbs in size and up to four 5" rockets under the outer wings. The bombs will have to be traded for drop tanks if you want extended range although there are hanger options to mix one drop tank and one bomb, a very useful consideration. Total ordinance potential for the C-Hog is around 6,400lbs combined internal/external, which is in the top 5 attack aircraft in the game.

    Maneuverability/Handling

    Quite good, exceptional at high speeds but a little tricky at low speeds. Prime speed for a Corsair is in excess of 250mph, anything over that and you should have nothing to fear. Coupled with great turn-rates at those speeds is an amazing roll rate that few aircraft can match other than the Fw190 series. The C-Hog also feels very stable at high speeds and can be quite violently maneuvered with little trouble. Turn-rate at lower speeds is not all that shabby either if you properly use your maneuvering flaps though I wouldn't attempt to out-turn a true turn-fighter under those conditions. Extreme speeds are no problem for the C-Hog, near vertical dives are no problem and chasing down someone who is attempting to dive away is entirely possible. One aspect of the C-Hog that is outstanding though is the ability to hold and mask energy. Even though the Hog is lacking in the ability to generate energy quickly, once it has it, it's mass can allow it to retain it very well. It is not always readily apparant to an enemy either as judging speed is much more difficult that judging altitude. A 500mph+ Hog can zoom like a rocketship where lesser opponents may simply be not able to match. Great care need be taken at lower speeds though, especially under 150mph where the ugly stall handling of the C-Hog can show up. The aircraft has very high torque from the engine and a stall at lower speeds can be very violent and quick. The C-Hog also has very bad deep stall characteristics, you can easily flat spin a C-Hog if you push it too far at low speeds. These stall problems accompanied with the flat spin can actually make for almost unrecoverable situations at low and medium altitudes. It is not uncommon to find unexperienced Hog pilots floating down from decent heights while unable to ever regain control of their aircraft when they've pushed it beyond its' limits. One other point, the ground handling of the C-Hog is just as spooky, it has a tendancy to ground-loop (spin out) and every attempt should be made to make 3 point landings (i.e. get the tailwheel down) so that you have that added stability on the runway. A hot landing with heavy braking all to oftens ends up in a ground-loop where the aircraft can flip and kill the pilot. They didn't call the Corsair the ensign eliminator for nothing.

    Flying the C-Hog

    Learn to love speed and roll rate. Build up your energy situation before you enter the fight as you will find it exceptionally hard to replace energy while you engaged. Most Corsair pilots will fight, break away to rebuild energy, then return. The lower you enter the fight the more speed you should have and often you can use this as an excellent merge maneuver, unmasking your huge energy position with a terrific zoom climb from under someone to a perch far above them. You need to ensure you retain energy as best you can, the C-Hog is not an exceptional turn-fighter if you are purely horizontal in your tactics, you are likely to run out of energy and options at the same time. You may also consider placing a floor altitude to any fight and break off at that point, dashing away while you still have some altitude to convert to speed.

    When offensive, don't be shy, take every shot you can even if you think they are typically "low-percentage". The C-Hog is one aircraft where it's more common to run out of fuel than out of bullets. Try to plan your entry into combat to correspond to a slightly lighter fuel load, the difference in handling is quite dramatic. A drop tank on one pylon is good for cruising/climb while you only take 75% internal fuel for the main part of combat, dropping your external tank shortly before you enter the fray. Stay fast whenever you can, even at the top of zoom climbs you don't always want to hang out there for long as your not really building energy all that well, it's better to be aggressive and keep the pressure on an enemy so he can't build energy either. I generally set my cannons out to D650 on the C-Hog, something I almost never do on any other aircraft, but in the C-Hog I tend to take more longer-range shots. The longer range setting also allows more flexibility when attacking ground targets such as GV's or structures. Scissors style maneuvers are very easily followed by a C-Hog and you can easily burn energy/speed if need be to counter an overshoot situation. The landing gear on the C-Hog, for example, can be deployed at very high speeds and can instantly add massive drag. Rolling or vertical scissors are very effective. You can also expect the C-Hog to be able to take some damage without too much trouble, a few pings from smaller calibre weapons are unlikely to be much problem, which is a valuable asset when generating overshoots because typically you end up giving at least some sort of firing opportunity to your opponent in an overshoot.
     
  2. Waystin2

    Waystin2 Administrator
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    Fighting a C-Hog


    Always try and identidy the C-Hog as soon as you can, it will appear much like the D-Hog but without the yellow cowl ring on the engine. If it's dark blue and the icon just as F4U then you should treat it with extra caution. The most dangerous Corsair is the one above you, not typically the one below you. If you are attacking Corsairs you want to do it from a position of equal energy and/or altitude. A favorite tactic of Corsair drivers is to trick you by hiding energy and then have you find out too late that you are in a position of disadvantage. Watch for Corsairs that come in extremely fast or seem to be able to zoom in from below you and climb thousands of feet almost instantly, this is an enemy that is hiding energy with speed. The Corsair doesn't climb or accelerate well for energy they lose is generally gone until after the engagement is completed. The C-Hog is particularily adept at this maneuver since it only has to count on a brief snapshot in order to win a fight. C-Hog drivers will tend to be slightly more aggressive in just trying to get you anywhere infront of them to take snapshots at long distances.


    You need to decide whether you want to energy fight or turn-fight a Corsair when you meet one. Typically this is decided by what you are flying and your energy state at the time of projected merge. The Corsairs can all be out-turned at lower speeds by decent turn-fighters but in some instances it won't be easy. Even if you don't out-turn one directly they will often fall into bad stalls and lose control, giving up excellent positions to land hits while they struggle to recover. This tends to be even more likely with inexperienced Corsair pilots for which you should be aggressive in trying to force them to stall fight. A stalled corsair should be a sure kill.


    If you want to energy fight one, be careful since they tend to hold energy well but can't replace what they lose. Try to get the enemy to aggressively maneuver with lead style turning while you take a less energy burning lag type pursuit. Extend if you need too but don't count on diving to extend since the corsairs all have excellent dive properties. Use the vertical if you can and exploit any energy building advantage your plane may have (climb rate, acceleration) to narrow any energy gap and then extend it in your favor. Once you have an E advantage the corsair is likely to try and dive away at which time you can decide whether to pursue or to maintain position and simply force him away. Energy fighting a C-Hog is just a little more dangerous as the potentially lethal area infront of it is larger so your energy tactics need to leave more seperation to defeat snapshots or spray'n'pray type tactics.


    Don't Head-On attack a Corsair, you typically won't know until too late whether you are facing a F4U-1, a C-Hog or D-Hog. The C-Hog is almost prone to try and force head-on's because it can actually win simply because it blows you to bits so far away that you may not have the opportunity to inflict your return punishment. It's sort of like MAD (Mutually Assured Destruction) except you may not get the pull your trigger because you will already be dead. Be careful to not expose yourself to even long range shots from a C-Hog either, the guns will be very effective at picking you apart at long ranges while you are trying to accelerate away. Watch out for close merges even where you may pass at a close enough range where the corsair could land hits on you. With the heavy ammo load and predictable ballistics you may find corsair pilots throw out some bullets just in your general direction if they think there is the possibility that you may fly through some of them. Running into 1 or 2 20mm rounds might be all that is required to end your day.


    Corsairs all have the ability to survive a lot of punishment, be prepared to land more hits to cause similar damage to what you might expect on some other planes. Don't bet your entire E reserve on a single pass unless you know you can land lots of hits since as a normally catastrophic shot may not instantly take down, or even seriously damage, a Corsair.
     

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